sovietreality:

Female Soviet college students studying for exam in the park in late 1960s.

sovietreality:

Female Soviet college students studying for exam in the park in late 1960s.

(via booklover)

archiemcphee:

For a wonderfully eerie ongoing project entitled Ghost Photographs American artist Angela Deane alters found photos, turning people into anonymous phantoms. The results range from amusing and delightful to wistful and melancholy. Deane’s painted snapshots reveal that ghosts go on vacation, attend prom and even go trick-or-treating. They have parties and gather to watch ballgames. It turns out that ghosts are just like the rest of us and we’re all ghosts ourselves.

"These ghosts are the ghosts of moments, of days, of experiences. With the specifics of identity obscured by paint I like to imagine it’s as if you and I can partake in the memory, share in the experience, allow the snapshot to seem familiar. Let’s share some memories, shall we?"

To view many more images from this haunting series follow Angela Deane here on Tumblr at ghostphotographs. Prints are available by contacting Deane through her personal website.

[via Junkculture and CreativeReview]

(Source: wordpainting)

sciencefriday:

Did you know: electric cars have been around since the early 1900s? In 1902, the Studebaker Corporation in South Bend, Indiana, introduced its first automobile: an electric car. Thomas Edison (third image) actually purchased the second electric car produced by Studebaker.

Eventually, though, electric cars lost out to gas vehicles. Learn more about what happened.

onlylolgifs:

Computer simulations that teach themselves to walk.

(via we-are-star-stuff)

the-gasoline-station:

Castle Meur: The House Between The Rocks | Via

Castel Meur, also known as La Maison du Gouffre or “the house between the rocks”, is a charming cottage wedged between two huge jagged rocks that has been drawing tourists to the otherwise quiet little village of Plougrescant, located in the department of Côtes-d’Armor in the region of Brittany, in France, since the 19th century.

The house has her back turned towards the sea, against which her owner sought to protect her by building the house in a cradle between the two rocks to shield her from the violent storms that frequent this place. The tiny house was built in 1861, at a time when building permits did not exist, where anyone could build at will. After the death of her original owner, Castel Meur served as the second home to the descendant’s family who lived here sporadically. The current occupant, the granddaughter of the first master of the house, has lived here since 2004 after selling her business in America and returning back to her land.

kqedscience:

Can you find the star of the premiere video for our new Deep Look science series in this photo? Watch our story on Tuesday, October 21.

kqedscience:

Can you find the star of the premiere video for our new Deep Look science series in this photo? Watch our story on Tuesday, October 21.

(Source: branstarkt, via mugglenet)

hueandeyephotography:

Courtyard Tree, Al Ain Palace, Al Ain, UAE
©Doug Hickok  All Rights Reserved

hueandeyephotography:

Courtyard Tree, Al Ain Palace, Al Ain, UAE

©Doug Hickok  All Rights Reserved

(Source: hueandeye.blogspot.com, via hueandeyephotography)

Sgt. Paul Braun and Iraqi interpreter became brothers.

StoryCorps’ Military Voices Initiative records stories from members of the U.S. military who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Paul Braun is a sergeant with the 34th Military Police Company in the Minnesota Army National Guard. In 2009, when he was serving near Basra, his company was assigned an Iraqi interpreter they called Philip.
Philip came to the U.S. in late 2013, with Sergeant Braun’s help, and now they live together in Minnesota. But Philip’s wife and children are still in Iraq. Earlier this week, he returned home, hoping to reach his family and bring them back to the U.S.
Shortly before leaving, Philip sat down with Sgt. Braun for a StoryCorps interview in Blaine, Minn. He recalled the first day they met.
"You scared me, dude," Philip says. "Your attitude in the beginning and with your Mohawk — "
"I scared everybody with that Mohawk," Braun says. Listen to the story.

Sgt. Paul Braun and Iraqi interpreter became brothers.

StoryCorps’ Military Voices Initiative records stories from members of the U.S. military who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Paul Braun is a sergeant with the 34th Military Police Company in the Minnesota Army National Guard. In 2009, when he was serving near Basra, his company was assigned an Iraqi interpreter they called Philip.

Philip came to the U.S. in late 2013, with Sergeant Braun’s help, and now they live together in Minnesota. But Philip’s wife and children are still in Iraq. Earlier this week, he returned home, hoping to reach his family and bring them back to the U.S.

Shortly before leaving, Philip sat down with Sgt. Braun for a StoryCorps interview in Blaine, Minn. He recalled the first day they met.

"You scared me, dude," Philip says. "Your attitude in the beginning and with your Mohawk — "

"I scared everybody with that Mohawk," Braun says. Listen to the story.

libraryjournal:

uispeccoll:

The binding started to peel off of this 1853 book, revealing some hidden secrets - old newsprint was used in the binding! [Stein PR4809 H3 S7 1853]

Saturday discovery!

libraryjournal:

uispeccoll:

The binding started to peel off of this 1853 book, revealing some hidden secrets - old newsprint was used in the binding! [Stein PR4809 H3 S7 1853]

Saturday discovery!